2015 Presenters & Topics

  • Preconference Workshop

    Institute for Healthcare Optimization
    (Requires preregistration and fee)

    Applying Queuing Theory to Healthcare: A Necessary Step Toward Improving Quality of Care and Margin

    Bio:

    The Institute for Healthcare Optimization  (IHO) is an independent not-for-profit 501(c)(3) research, education and service organization that brings together knowledge of operations science with clinical, analytic, and organizational expertise to drive practical, high-impact improvements in healthcare. The mission of the Institute is to serve as a catalyst and to provide a vehicle for spreading the application of operations management and patient flow variability management techniques across the broader hospital community, as well as other parts of the healthcare delivery system. For more information, visit IHO’s Web site at www.ihoptimize.org.

    Topic:

    Applying Queuing Theory to Healthcare: A Necessary Step Toward Improving Quality of Care and Margin

    IHO is pleased to announce a half-day workshop, Applying Queuing Theory to Health Care: A Necessary Step Toward Improving Quality of Care and Margin taught by Dr. Eugene Litvak, who has been teaching queuing theory to clinicians for many years. Several different queuing theory models will be introduced and accompanied by extensive exercises. Different healthcare problems require different queuing models. The key is to know specifically which model to apply in what healthcare setting.

    This is an optional preconference workshop available on Monday, May 4 from 1 to 5 p.m.. This workshop is NOT part of the standard Patient Flow Summit agenda. Preregistration is required along with the payment of an additional fee.  Class size will be limited.  

    Learn more about this unique learning opportunity with one of healthcare’s foremost patient flow experts.

  • Eugene Litvak, Ph.D.

    President and CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Optimization
    Adjunct Professor of Operations Management at the Harvard School of Public Health

    The Necessary and Sufficient Steps in Patient Flow Management

    Bio:

    Eugene Litvak, Ph.D, is President and CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Optimization and an Adjunct Professor of Operations Management in the Department of Health Policy & Management at the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Litvak is an author of more than 60 publications in the areas of operations management in health care delivery organizations. He is the editor of The Joint Commission’s patient flow book Managing Patient Flow in Hospitals: Strategies and Solutions, 2nd Edition, and the leader of the organization’s first patient flow seminars. He was a member of the IOM Committees “The Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System” and “The Learning Health Care System in America” and is currently a member of the IOM’s “Committee on Optimizing Scheduling in Health Care.” Dr. Litvak also served as a member of the “National Advisory Committee to the American Hospital Association for Improving Quality, Patient Safety and Performance.”

    Topic:

    The Necessary and Sufficient Steps in Patient Flow Management

    The escalating growth in interest in patient flow reflects widespread recognition that it is a critically important aspect of the health care delivery system in the United States and throughout the world. The reasons for this interest are well known—crowded emergency departments and excessive patient waiting times there and elsewhere, limited access to care, heavy workloads for nurses and other staff, scarce health care workforce resources, and skyrocketing health care costs. The importance of patient flow cannot be overestimated, especially in light of the Affordable Care Act, because only by addressing patient flow issues can we simultaneously improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care. The growing interest to patient flow has stimulated numerous ideas and interventions aimed at addressing these challenges.

    How to navigate in this sea of methods and approaches? Imagine that you have already implemented all your patient flow initiatives, could you then answer the following questions: Would your ED still be overcrowded? Would your nurses taking care of more patients than they should? Would you still have unsatisfactory levels of mortality, HAIs and readmissions? Would patient wait times be acceptable? The answers to these questions will be discussed. The guidance of how to make the first steps in the journey of patient flow improvement will be presented along with several case studies.

     

  • Joseph N Mott, FACHE

    Vice President, Healthcare Transformation
    Intermountain Healthcare

    The Princess Bride Meets Healthcare Reform

    Bio:

    Joe Mott, FACHE, MBA,  began his career with Intermountain Health in 1985. His Intermountain experience includes 20 years at Primary Children’s Hospital were he served as CFO, COO, and CEO. While at Primary, Joe redesigned the Quality Improvement department, created the Systems Improvement Department, developed a new payer contracting model, and implemented managerial accountability models that helped the hospital achieve high national quality rankings while becoming one of the lowest cost children’s hospitals. In 2011, Joe was appointed Intermountain’s VP for Healthcare Transformation and asked to lead the development and implementation of Intermountain Healthcare’s Shared Accountability strategy – to move Intermountain to population-based payment.

    Intermountain Healthcare is a nonprofit health system based in Salt Lake City, Utah, with 22 hospitals, ​about 1,100 employed primary care and secondary care physicians at more than 185 clinics in the Intermountain Medical Group, and health insurance plans (through SelectHealth). Learn more

    Topic:

    The Princess Bride Meets Healthcare Reform

    The U.S. healthcare system is plagued with three structural flaws: 1) a lack of evidence-based standards, 2) a lack of patient engagement, and 3) misaligned financial incentives. Bending the cost curve requires us to solve all three of these problems simultaneously. In this session, we will explore Intermountain Healthcare’s strategic plan to do just that!

    We will describe how Intermountain plans to significantly increase the use of evidence-based standards; our work to better connect with patients through patient-focused care management, shared decision making tools, and more; and finally, our efforts to figure out a payment model that takes the focus off volume and begins to “pay for value!”

    Intermountain has climbed the Cliffs of Insanity, endured the Pit of Despair, and travelled through the Fire Swamp. This journey is filled with danger and intrigue including castle moats and shrieking eels. Come learn the details of Intermountain Healthcare’s story—lessons learned and how these lessons can apply in your own organization.

  • J. Celeste Kallenborn; Melissa D. Cole; David Wien

    Vice President of Acute Care Services; Director of Emergency Services; Medical Director and Chief of Emergency Medicine
    Tampa General Hospital

    Improving Patient Flow with ED Process Redesign

    Bio:

    Celeste Kallenborn, RN, BSN, MBA, NE-BC, has worked as a Trauma Program Manager and Director of Med-Surg at Tampa General Hospital where she currently works as the Vice President of Acute Care Services. Celeste has published multiple articles and has spoken at a number of national conferences. Celeste has also served a co-Principal Investigator for the Assessment of the Florida Trauma System.

    Melissa Cole, ARNP, MSN, ANP-BC, began her clinical experience at the Cleveland Clinic in the neurologic ICU. She came to Tampa General Hospital as the Trauma Program Manager and was later promoted to Director of Emergency Services. In this role, she has responsibility for the emergency department, the trauma program and psychiatric services.  Melissa also continues to work as an ED nurse practitioner.

    David Wien, MD, MBA, FACEP, started with Tampa General Hospital while in graduate school completing an ED administrative fellowship.  He later joined Tampa General Hospital’s faculty of Emergency Medicine serving as Clerkship Director and Associate Medical Director. And in 2013, he became the Medical Director and Chief of Emergency Medicine at Tampa General. 

    Tampa General Hospital is a private not-for-profit hospital and one of the most comprehensive medical facilities in West Central Florida serving a dozen counties with a population in excess of 4 million. As one of the largest hospitals in Florida, Tampa General is licensed for 1,018 beds. Learn more

    Topic:

    Improving Patient Flow with ED Process Redesign

    A comprehensive emergency department patient flow process redesign has made a tremendous impact on Tampa General Hospital ability to efficiently provide care for its patients.  Tampa General’s transforming “CPR” initiative included three Lean methodology based phases to enhance operational efficiencies: 1. Arrival to Provider, 2. Provider to Decision, and 3. Decision to Leave ED.

    We will walk through the methodologies and process that Tampa General developed to transform patient care.  We will talk about how Tampa General created a split-level intake mode, redesigned their ED lobby, partnered with the laboratory and radiology to reduce test turn around time, introduced parallel admissions processing, and more.

    We will also review comparative data that illustrate the impact Tampa General’s process redesign has had on such metrics as as patient volume, left without being seen, and length of stay.

  • Paula Doering, RN

    Vice-President of Clinical Programs for Peri-Operative Services and Cancer
    The Ottawa Hospital

    A Path to Financial Health by Reducing Surgical Variability

    Bio:

    Paula Doering, RN, BScN, EMBA, has been with The Ottawa Hospital since 1983.  Currently, she holds the position of the Vice-President of Clinical Programs for Peri-Operative Services and Cancer as well as Medical Imaging and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine.  She is also the Regional Vice-President of Cancer for the Champlain Local Health Integrated Network (LHIN), reporting to Cancer Care Ontario.  She is responsible for the quality, standards, and advancement of cancer care for the region.

    The Ottawa Hospital provides 1,149 beds across 3 campuses. It’s the largest Canadian academic hospital—serving 1.2 million people across Eastern Ontario each year. In the last 10 years, roughly $1 billion has been invested to improve the quality of care the hospital provides to the population it serves. Learn more

    Topic:

    A Path to Financial Health by Reducing Surgical Variability

    An initiative by The Ottawa Hospital to improve the quality of patient care led to the redesign of surgical operations, including the separation of elective and non-elective surgical care.  This new approach got surgery patients into and out of the hospital faster—improving quality of care indicators while also increasing the financial health of the hospital.

    We will discuss the challenges that The Ottawa Hospital faced, the methodologies and processes engaged to address those challenges, and the impact of those changes on the hospital and on patient care. 

    We will review several indicators used to measure the impact of the changes including hospital efficiency measures (time to operation, overall hospital length of stay, and post-operative length of stay) and quality of care measures (in-hospital mortality, delirium, UTI, and fluid and electrolyte abnormalities).

  • Mary A. Ditri

    Director, Professional Practice

    New Jersey Hospital Association (NJHA)

    A Patient Throughput Collaborative: Lessons Learned From Across New Jersey

    Bio:

    Mary A. Ditri, MA, CHCC
, facilitates patient safety and quality improvement efforts in partnership with hospitals throughout New Jersey and acts as the project manager for the statewide Patient Throughput Collaborative. Previously she worked as director of quality management, organizational development, and patient satisfaction in three different New Jersey hospitals. She has also served in the Office of the Medical Director at the New Jersey Department of Human Services. She is currently completing her Doctorate in Health Care Administration.

    The New Jersey Hospital Association (NJHA) represents 400 healthcare organizations including hospitals, health systems, nursing homes, home health agencies, and educational institutions. NJHA works to provide quality, affordable and accessible healthcare to the people of the Garden State.  Learn more

    Topic:

    A Patient Throughput Collaborative: Lessons Learned From Across New Jersey

    The New Jersey Hospital Association (NJHA) developed and managed a project partially funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ Partnership for Patients initiative. The project included 14 New Jersey hospitals and involved integrating organizational changes, system efficiency optimizations, and quality improvement initiatives to help reshape care delivery. Project goals included reducing inpatient harm and readmissions while improving quality of care.

    Working with a team of experts, the participating hospitals assessed uncontrolled and unpredictable peaks in patient demand that impeded care quality and increase costs.  At the conclusion of the high-intensity project, participants not only experienced the beneficial impact of patient flow improvements, but they also strengthened their institutional patient throughput knowledge and increased their ability to drive ongoing operational improvements.

    We will review how the collaborative approach of this project helped the involved hospitals apply principles, techniques, and tools, to smooth patient throughput, increase operational efficiency, and lower costs while improving care quality. 

  • Norm Dinerman, MD, FACEP

    Medical Director of the Transfer Center
    Eastern Maine Medical Center

    Leveraging Work Force Cultural Determinants:
    Forging a More Effective Partnership between Tribes

    Bio:

    Norm Dinerman, MD, FACEP, serves as the Medical Director, LifeFlight of Maine. He is also the Medical Director of the Transfer Center, the Tele-health program and the Regional Health Care Partnership Provider Relations program at Eastern Maine Medical Center.  Additionally, he is the Physician Advisor to the Emergency Medical Treatment Active Labor Act (EMTALA) compliance program. 

    Dr. Dinerman continues to practice clinically as an emergency medicine physician in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Eastern Maine Medical Center. He is a native of New York City and received his undergraduate education at Columbia University and his medical degree from Yale University.  

    Eastern Maine Medical Center (EMMC) serves communities throughout central, eastern, and northern Maine. Located in Bangor, the 411-bed Level II trauma center provides both primary and specialty care services and hosts a statewide medical helicopter service, LifeFlight of Maine.  Learn more

    Topic:

    Leveraging Work Force Cultural Determinants:
    Forging a More Effective Partnership between Tribes

    Physicians and nurses comprise the two most visible front line tribes of health care.  Co-habitating within the same eco-system are administrative colleagues with a broad spectrum of responsibilities for assuring the viability and sustenance of the health care crucible in which patient care is delivered. Each discipline is defined not only by its respective skill set, but by cultural themes and expectations which may resonate, or create friction between the tribes. The resulting fractious or harmonious relationship between tribal members affects service reliability, customer satisfaction, safety, compliance, bottom line fundamentals and the over-all clinical performance of the health care team.

    This talk defines a number of markers which distinguish the work place cultures of the three most dominant tribes.  In consequential practices with acknowledged autonomy, risk and mutual dependency, these individuals must achieve an alignment of beliefs, paradigms and problem solving strategies across the cultures.  The identification and leverage of respective cultural attributes to create a single synergistic high-performance organizational tapestry on behalf of outstanding patient care is the goal.  The many points of cultural similarity between the disciplines would suggest this to be a fertile area for leadership to explore and apply.

  • Barbara Sommer; Maria Ferlita

    Vice President, Patient Flow Services; Senior Vice President, Finance
    Maimonides Medical Center

    Out of the Gate and Running! A Transfer Center Startup Story

    Bio:

    Barbara Sommer, RN, MA, CEN, NE-BC, spent 24 years in emergency nursing in staff nursing and leadership roles. Prior to moving to Patient Flow Services, she served as Maimonides Vice President of Nursing with responsibility for the medicine division and staffing office; and she had liaison responsibilities to the IT department, special nursing related projects and capacity management. She’s currently responsible for Maimonides transfer/contact center, patient access, transport, and capacity management. 

    Maria Ferlita, MBA oversees a wide range of operational and financial activities at Maimonides including patient flow and throughput, patient transport, patient access, financial services, medical records, and capacity management. Maria’s responsibilities include pursuing new service expansion opportunities and implementing new revenue producing operations. She played a critical role in creating Maimonides successful centralized transfer center, which improved patient and physician access to the Maimonides healthcare delivery system.

    Maimonides Medical Center started in 1911 as a small dispensary serving the poor & needy in Brooklyn, New York. Today, it’s a thriving medical center recognized for its achievements in advancing medical & information technology. Maimonides has 711 beds and over 70 subspecialty programs. Learn more

    Topic:

    Out of the Gate and Running! A Transfer Center Startup Story

    By the start of 2013, executives at Maimonides Medical Center recognized the potential value of a centralized transfer center and incorporated an initiative to create one into their strategic priority plan.  The management team believed that establishing the transfer center would better facilitate transfers and direct admissions from physicians and hospitals improving patient and physician access to Maimonides’ healthcare system.  After opening the transfer center later that year, Maimonides immediately saw the value of this direction as the new processes and services significantly increased transfer volumes and revenues.

    We will walk through strategy behind Maimonides transfer center.  We will explore their implementation approach, explain how the transfer center fits into the care ecosystem including how integration with bed control helps Maimonides better manage capacity in real time, and we’ll look at the numbers—reviewing the transfer center’s impact on transfer volume and revenue. 

  • Mark S. Kestner, MD

    Chief Medical Innovation Officer
    Community Regional Medical Center

    The Command Center and the Patient Story

    Bio:

    Mark Kestner, MD, MBA, is responsible for the development of new models of care to optimize operational efficiency and improve resource utilization at Community Regional Medical Center. He has previously served as a Chief Quality Officer, Chief Medical Officer and consultant for a number of health systems.  Dr. Kestner has spoken in many national forums on topics related to innovation in healthcare including the Center for Healthcare Transformation, National Press Club, and the U.S. House Committee on Energy and Commerce, Health Subcommittee.

    Community Regional Medical Center in Fresno, California is the flagship of Community Medical Centers’ three acute-care facilities, with 641 licensed beds. In the 2012-2013 fiscal year, Community Regional treated 107,105 patients in its emergency department and had 38,933 admissions.  Learn More

    Topic:

    The Command Center and the Patient Story

    Technology has—in some ways—increased the complexity of bedside care delivery.  But when correctly utilized, technology can increase the accuracy of the “patient story” providing the multi-disciplinary healthcare workforce with increased data visibility that in turn facilitates better patient care decisions.

    Community Regional Medical Center developed a 24/7 Command Center (or “Air Traffic Control Center”) to oversee patient flow into and through their facility. The Command Center team ensures the proper documentation of every “patient story” that enters their facility, reviews the “patient story” to ensure that it includes an accurate problem list, an anticipated length of stay and a plan of care, validates whether quality and safety concerns need to be addressed, and places patients based on the care needed.  

    Come hear how Community Regional Command Center approach encourages smarter multidisciplinary rounding, improves the Case Mix Index, mitigates denial risk, increases patient flow, and simplifies the workflow of the bedside clinician.

  • David Fernandez

    Vice President of Cancer Hospital, RWJ/CINJ Practice Plan, Neuroscience and Perioperative Services
    Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital

    Let My Patients Flow! Streamlining the OR Suite

    Bio:

    David Fernandez, MHA, is responsible for providing leadership, direction and operational management to all oncology, neuroscience and perioperative program services. David has focused much of his career applying cutting edge management techniques in the perioperative environment including successfully applying computer simulation to improve clinical based care.

    Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital (RWJUH) is a 965-bed hospital in Central New Jersey. It serves as the flagship hospital of the 1,733 bed Robert Wood Johnson Health System. RWJUH is a Level 1 Trauma Center that has consistently been ranked as one of the nation’s top hospitals.  Learn more

    Topic:

    Let My Patients Flow! Streamlining the OR Suite

    Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital anticipated a significant increase in patient volume for their OR suite.  Due to the highly variable nature of work flow in the OR and the expenses involved in managing the projected increase of volume, as well as the introduction of case carts into the OR system, leadership realized that an objective data driven analysis needed to be conducted in order to assure optimal performance of the OR suite.

    The OR management team formed clinical based PI teams to steer the streamlining efforts and employed data driven simulation modeling to address the highly variable nature of the work with the goal of increasing patient throughput by 30% with no or little increase in costs.

    This session describes the use of lean management principles and simulation modeling to streamline the flow through the entire OR suite of this large complex major urban hospital. Attendees will learn about the use of clinical performance improvement teams, lean flow principles, and simulation modeling to guide decision making in improving patient flow.

  • David J Yu, MD

    Medical Director, Adult Inpatient Medicine Service (AIMS)
    Presbyterian Medical Group (PMG), Presbyterian Hospital

    Patient Flow Process in the New Reimbursement Reality

    Bio:

    David Yu, MD, MBA is the Medical Director of Adult Inpatient Medicine Services at Presbyterian Healthcare. Dr. Yu is actively involved in Society of Hospital Medicine, and has served on several SHM national committees. He has also gained national recognition for his work on the Unit Base Model with Multidisciplinary Rounding incorporating Lean Six Sigma concepts.  

    Presbyterian Hospital is the largest acute care hospital in New Mexico with 453 beds and the flagship institution for Presbyterian Healthcare Services, a not-for-profit system of hospitals, a health plan and a growing medical group.  Presbyterian began caring for area residents over 100 years.  Learn more

    Topic:

    Patient Flow Process in the New Reimbursement Reality

    Patient Flow used to be the emergency department’s problem. When the ED went on bypass or the CEO received an irate patient letter about wait times, the administration leaned on the ED chair to do something about throughput. Even today, ED physicians chair most patient flow committees. But all that is changing.

    With Medicare funding cuts and the rebirth of capitation, hospitals must transition from revenue centers to cost centers, shifting their focus from generating revenue to cutting costs. Hospitals are finally realizing what fixing patient flow should have been all along: a comprehensive, strategic initiative that aligns all clinical departments, departmental budgets and administrative processes to drive operational efficiency.

    We will review how healthcare reform changes the care reimbursement model and how this impacts hospitals across the United States. We will focus on how hospitals can leverage multidisciplinary patient flow initiatives to remain financially competitive in this changing cost-driven care environment using Presbyterian Hospital, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, as an example. 

  • John Pennington

    Manager, Enterprise Patient Flow
    New York-Presbyterian Hospital

    Achieving Zero Dead Bed Time

    Bio:

    John Pennington, MBA, spent many years engaging with hospitals from Baton Rouge to New York City to collaboratively solve healthcare problems by applying Lean methodologies and sound process principles technology. At New York-Presbyterian Hospital (NYP), John manages the patient flow initiatives across the six hospital, 2,478 bed, system, co-chairs the Environmental Services Committee and Transport Committee, and provides patient flow assessments to NYP system hospitals in their efforts to improve EVS and transport functions. 

    New York-Presbyterian Hospital, based in New York City, is one of the nation’s largest and most comprehensive hospitals. In 2013, the Hospital had over 2 million inpatient and outpatient visits, including 14,600 deliveries and 311,731 visits to its emergency departments. Learn more

    Topic:

    Achieving Zero Dead Bed Time

    A patient is discharged and a bed opens. What happens next?  We will answer this question from the perspective of bed management, emergency department, environmental services, and transport team—pulling data and experiences from New York-Presbyterian Hospital’s successful efforts to improve patient flow.

    A patient discharge is such a pivotal event in providing efficient care. The principle behind “it takes a village . . .” applies to achieving zero bed time—it requires attention from across departments to reach this goal. Nurses, administrators, and other hospital staff will share their perspective on the challenges and solutions associated with achieving this objective.

    We will also review two years of transport discharge data to understand the key decisions, learning moments, and milestones that have marked New York-Presbyterian’s progression towards achieving zero dead bed time.

  • Emily Lowder, Ph.D., RN

    Director of Patient Logistics
    University of Chicago Medicine

    Discharge Process Reengineering to Enhance Organizational Throughput

    Bio:

    Emily Lowder, Ph.D., RN, NE-BC, oversees patient throughput, the transfer center, the clinical short-stay units, supplemental staffing, patient care support nurses, and the advanced practice nursing service. Previously, she spent time at as the Manager of Nursing Education, focusing on clinical training.  She has also worked as a staff nurse, clinical nurse educator, and manager of patient care operation at Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago.

    University of Chicago Medicine is a 616-bed academic urban medical center, located on the South Side of Chicago. The medical campus includes the Center for Care and Discovery, Comer Children’s Hospital, Bernard A. Mitchell Hospital, and the Duchossois Center for Advanced Medicine. Learn more

    Topic:

    Discharge Process Reengineering to Enhance Organizational Throughput

    As the management team at University of Chicago Medicine reviewed the growing complexities associated with providing patient care, they recognized opportunities for operational efficiency gains around their discharge planning and coordination. The organization embarked on a year-long initiative to enhance throughput, establish a patient logistics department and enhance the discharge planning process.

    Tools were designed using Lean methodologies to support discharge coordination. Discharge tools were created including a standardized discharge checklist, a whiteboard-based potential discharge planning process for the upcoming day, the addition of multidisciplinary discharge rounding on all adult inpatient units, and the implementation of an organizational weekly throughput dashboard, focused on discharge metrics.

    We will discuss how the University of Chicago Medicine team identified opportunities, designed processes and tools, implemented solutions, and measured the impact of their efforts.

  • Marcia Colone, Ph.D.

    System Director, Department of Care Coordination and Social Work
    UCLA Health

    Reducing Readmissions Through a Thriving Post-Acute Care Network

    Bio:

    Marcia Colone, Ph.D., ACM, brings a diverse set of experiences from a long career working in academic medical centers, community, and governmental environments. At UCLA Health, her responsibilities include care management and transition planning across the UCLA Health system. She has focused on designing care delivery models that improve access, patient care, collaboration and fiscal accountability. And she has engaged with a variety of agencies to improve care transitions, implement quality improvements, and reduce readmissions.

    UCLA Health has provided the best in healthcare and the latest in medical technology to the people of Los Angeles for more than 50 years.  Led by its flagship hospital, Ronald Regan UCLA Medical Center, UCLA Health is consistently ranked one of the top five hospitals in the United States. Learn More

    Topic:

    Reducing Readmissions Through a Thriving Post-Acute Care Network

    The forces of change have hit health care like a sledgehammer bringing with them a mandate for an effective post acute care network. Increasing health care costs, emergence of ACOs, the increase of unfunded patients that create throughput issues and the new managed care populations demand out-of-the box strategies. This presentation will focus on the development of two innovative partnerships within our post acute care network that include skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.  Both partnerships include a well-defined accountable model of care, a focus on quality outcomes and reduction of 30 day readmissions.

  • Lisa Woodward; David Wilcher; John Hoffman

    Director of Business Systems, Information Systems; Business Analyst; Senior Business Analyst
    UW Health (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

    EMR + RTLS = Enhanced Patient Flow and Care Coordination

    Bio:

    Lisa Woodward, MBA, started her career at UW Hospital and Clinics 25 years ago, she has been an innovator and a leader spearheading projects in new product/program development and oversight, application integration design, and systems innovation. In her current role, Lisa is responsible for all Revenue Cycle and Business Systems across UW Health.

    David Wilcher has played an integral role in the development and implementation of UW Health’s RTLS solutions.  Most recently this has included the patient flow solution at the Digestive Health Center and the development of business intelligence tools for analyzing RTLS data. David holds a bachelor’s degree in Information Systems from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. 

    John Hoffman pioneered a mobile RTLS solution for asset tracking at UW Health and has been key to the innovation and development of the solution ever since. John specializes in development of the RTLS systems architecture, network infrastructure and hardware.  John holds a bachelor’s degree in cartography from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

    UW Health is comprised of the academic health care entities of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Its flagship hospital, the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, is a 592-bed facility that ranks among the finest academic medical centers in the United States. Learn more

    Topic:

    EMR + RTLS = Enhanced Patient Flow and Care Coordination

    University of Wisconsin Health (UW Health) recognizes the importance of health information technology to improve the patient experience and operational efficiency. We will walk through the design and implementation of a Real Time Location System (RTLS) for patient flow and its integration with our Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system. We will review the operational, technical, and patient and family centered care considerations of the project and results achieved, along with additional solutions in testing for future implementation.

    In our presentation we will 1) provide an overview of what an RTLS solution is, describing how it can be used to enhance patient flow, team coordination, and communication, 2) discuss the development and implementation of the integration between an RTLS and the EMR, 3) outline how the RTLS system can be used to drive process improvement, and 4) identify opportunities for integrating additional systems and technology to increase the focus on patient and family centered care.

  • Jeff Hintz; Deb Hassler

    Manager of Patient Placement & Legacy One Call Transfer Center; Director, Clinical and Support Services
    Legacy Health

    Running a Transfer Center with Non-Clinical Staff. It Can Be Done!

    Bio:

    Jeff Hintz, MBA, has worked at Legacy Health for over 10 years—more than 8 years of that time has been in the transfer center. He has an MBA in Healthcare Management through OHSU (Oregon Health and Science University).  He has helped drive a variety of successful initiatives to improve patient care and flow at Legacy Health.             

    Deb Hassler, MS, FACHE, oversees the Legacy One Call Transfer Center and Patient Placement.  Deb has worked as a healthcare professional for more than 30 years in a variety of roles.  Before her current position, she was a Vice President at Central Washington Hospital.

    Legacy Health is a nonprofit, locally owned organization based in Portland, Oregon, and serving Oregon and Southwest Washington. It includes 2 regional hospitals, 3 community hospitals, and a children’s hospital (representing more than 1700 beds) as well as several other clinics and services.  Learn More

    Topic:

    Running a Transfer Center with Non-Clinical Staff. It Can Be Done!

    Transfer centers are no longer a one trick pony! Transfers Centers have morphed into multifaceted departments that centralize services for the entire health system. They have become essential to efficient patient flow across the hospital. Given the growing importance they play in the hospital ecosystem, many believe that clinically trained staff must staff a transfer center for it to be successful. How can a non-clinical staff member possibly triage patient symptoms, assess their needs and place them with the proper nursing unit?

    With appropriate support, structure and processes, we’ve found that it can be done—and done well! Join us as we discuss how each month our Legacy One Call Center handles 350 transfers (inpatient to inpatient and ED to ED) and places more than 3,700 ED and OR patients—all done with non-clinical staff!

  • Michael Harrington

    Patient Flow Consultant
    Central Logic

    Capacity Optimization – What You Should Know

    Bio:

    Michael Harrington, MPT, MBA, has spent more than 20 years in tertiary and quaternary hospital operations as a clinician, an administrator, and a change agent. He has led departments including the ED, patient placement, and patient transportation. Mike is a process and data junkie. His resume includes certifications in Six Sigma and Lean. When not chasing numbers, he’s chasing after his 3 kids and dog.

    Central Logic provides innovative transfer center and bed management solutions. Central Logic collaborates with physicians, administrators, and staff to design and implement patient flow software solutions that increase admissions and capacity while conserving internal resources. Learn more

    Topic:

    Capacity Optimization – What You Should Know

    More than just transfer centers, patient placement, housekeeping and patient transportation, effective hospital capacity management includes applying proven methodologies to real data to achieve profound results. Much like any professional who masters a craft, hospital leaders responsible for capacity optimization must understand the underlying principles of patient flow and operational efficiency, and how to apply these.

    Come join us as we take a tour through the operational science that powers patient flow and operational efficiency efforts.  Stops will include TQM, Lean, Six Sigma, Theory of Constraints, and Queuing Theory as well as data analytics and display considerations.  Participants will review variables that influence flow, learn how to manipulate flow using a variety of process improvement methodologies, and discuss how the right data analysis tools can help measure flow.